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Opening Day Countdown: Quintessential Red #56

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Next up, #56. A couple of options here with ranging qualities of "good".

Honorable mention: Harry Spilman, Paul Householder, Wade Rowdon, Rosario Rodriguez, Willie Greene, Jeff Kaiser, Scott Klingenbeck, Aaron Myette, Justin Freeman

5. Matt Maloney (-0.0 WAR)

Matt Maloney was actually a pretty positive contributor to the team until his last season in 2011, which went about as well for him as it did for the entire Reds team that year. Maloney ended up with 11 starts and 11 bullpen appearances for the Reds over 3 seasons, the bulk of those seasons spent as a fixture in the Louisville Bats rotation. He spent last year at the AA level in the Red Sox organization, in case you were wondering.

4. Lenny Harris (0.7 WAR)

For every one of these numbers, we usually have at least one guy who wore it for his rookie year and never again. This is our best candidate for #56. He ended up having a stellar rookie season in 1988, hitting .372/.420/.395 in 51 PA. As you may know, he went on to have a long career, mostly as a bench guy .

3. Todd Coffey (1.3 WAR)

I bet you thought he'd be higher on this list, too. He broke into the big leagues in 2005 and put up some really solid performances for his first 2 years... until he was thrust into the closer's role and floundered big time. He's actually got slightly better as he's gotten older, and has made stops in Washington and Milwaukee before his most recent big league season with the Dodgers.

2. Ted Davidson (3.2 WAR)

I'll admit, I didn't know much about Ted Davidson before this list, but he had a really nice start to his career as a Red. He wore #56 in 1965-1966, where he came up as a 25-year-old reliever and jumped right in. He put up a 3.16 ERA in 78 appearances in his first two seasons. He ended up getting traded in the Milt Pappas deal in 1968, where he pitched a few games with the Braves and called it a career.

1. Scott Sullivan (6.1 WAR)

This is pretty much reliever central, and I don't think too many guys signify the the late 90s Reds teams more than Scott Sullivan. Sullivan was the Reds' go-to reliever, amassing over 100 innings in 4 straight years. He spent parts of 9 seasons with the Reds, until he was traded to the White Sox in an August deal (for previous listee Tim Hummel).

Happy 56 days left!