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Brandon Phillips

  • One of the things I'm looking forward to this offseason is lots and lots of Homer Bailey hype. Here's some of the first I've seen.
  • Baseball players apparently used to wear sweaters. I did not know that.
  • Red Hot Mama has some Reds celebrity look alikes. Bronson Arroyo's highest comp might surprise you. Or it might not I guess.
  • Redleg Nation has a piece up on the Reds AFL players. I'm honestly not as excited about Arizona Fall League action this year, because the Reds really didn't send any huge names. I'm pretty bullish on Calvin Medlock, and Pelland and Dumatrait still have shots at turning into something, but that's about it.
  • Been a rough few days for new announcer Thom Brennaman. King Kaufman rips him pretty good here for claiming Jeff Kent as the greatest second baseman of all time, and then you've got Brennaman having to aplogize on air for making fun of a blind guy.
  • This says that baseball is becoming more like the NFL when it comes to the financial side of things, but what shocked me was reading that the Detroit Tigers received $25 million in revenue sharing at the end of last season. The Detroit Tigers. Detroit. You know, one of the biggest cities in the country. I guess MLB really is becoming more like the NFL if they're now rewarding incompetent ownership and management.
  • Some interesting tidbits from Cleveland's front office, including this on Brandon Phillips:
    Brandon Phillips: When the Indians traded Phillips to the Reds in April, manager Eric Wedge and the big-league staff pushed for the deal, the front office pushed against it.

    The seeds of the trade may have been planted in September 2005. Phillips, ending a mediocre season at Class AAA Buffalo, berated John Farrell, Indians director of player development, in the locker room in front of other players, when he was told he wasn't among the September call-ups. When word reached Wedge about Phillips treatment of Farrell, he was not pleased.