The Greatest Reds: #70 - #66

70. Dusty Miller

Played as Red Primary Position Career Rank Peak Rank Prime Rank
1895-1899 RF 87 57 58
Percent Breakdown of Value Best Season Best player on Reds
Hit Field Pitch 1898 Never
80% 20% 0%
Awards/Honors as a Red Leading the League On the Reds Leaderboard
N/A N/A

-9th in career batting average
-13th in career stolen bases
-33rd in career triples
-43rd in career RBI
-48th in career runs scored

The greatest "Dusty" ever associated with the Cincinnati Reds, Miller appeared more or less out of nowhere in 1895 after not having played (at best as I can find) for the four previous seasons. Miller was a good hitter (.308 batting average with the Reds over five seasons), who possessed both power and speed (finished 4th in total bases a couple times, and stole 76 bases in 125 games in 1896), but defended right field in a way that could charitably be described as "bad". In 1899, he very suddenly stopped being a good hitter, and his career was over.

69. Ed Bailey

Played as Red Primary Position Career Rank Peak Rank Prime Rank
1953-1961 C 77 79 61
Percent Breakdown of Value Best Season Best player on Reds
Hit Field Pitch 1956 Never
68% 32% 0%
Awards/Honors as a Red Leading the League On the Reds Leaderboard
All Star – 1956, 1957, 1960 (2) N/A

-17th in career AB/HR ratio
-26th in career home runs
-33rd in career walks
-34th in career on-base percentage
-43rd in career slugging percentage

For a 25 year period (1956-1980, with a 1-year exception of 1961), the Reds had considerable stability behind the plate—a three man regime that began with Ed Bailey. In his first full season of 1956, Bailey posted what would remain career highs in runs (59), hits (115), home runs (28), RBI (75), and OPS+ (143). His brother Jim briefly pitched with the Reds in 1959 to form a unique battery of brothers.

68. Hans Lobert

Played as Red Primary Position Career Rank Peak Rank Prime Rank
1906-1910 3B, SS 83 50 53
Percent Breakdown of Value Best Season Best player on Reds
Hit Field Pitch 1908 1908
76% 24% 0%
Awards/Honors as a Red Leading the League On the Reds Leaderboard
N/A AB/K ratio – 1910

-2nd in career AB/K ratio
-12th in career sacrifice hits
-16th in career stolen bases
-33rd in career triples
-43rd in career OPS+

Known as one of the fastest men in the game at the time he played, Lobert once raced a racehorse around the bases as a publicity stunt. His 5-year tenure with the Reds was spotty, but symmetrical: a good hitting season in limited playing time, followed by a weak season, followed by a truly great season, followed by a weak season, followed by a good hitting season in limited playing time. In the great season (1908), Lobert dominated a low run-scoring environment (his 63 RBI were good for 6th best in the NL) with a 144 OPS+ (5th best) that was paired with 47 steals (3rd).

67. Pat Duncan

Played as Red Primary Position Career Rank Peak Rank Prime Rank
1919-1924 LF 79 46 55
Percent Breakdown of Value Best Season Best player on Reds
Hit Field Pitch 1922 Never
79% 21% 0%
Awards/Honors as a Red Leading the League On the Reds Leaderboard
N/A N/A

-8th in single season doubles (1922)
-11th in career batting average
-28th in career triples
-45th in career hits
-47th in career RBI

Called up to Cincinnati late in the 1919 season to spell ineffective left-fielders Rube Bressler and Sherry Magee, Duncan quickly solidified himself as the starting left-fielder in just 31 games, and found himself hitting 5th in game 1 of the 1919 World Series, played in all 8 games, and drove in 8 runs to lead the Reds. He then owned the position for four full seasons, showing remarkable consistency while adapting to the new live-ball era (season-by-season OPS+ marks: 109, 109, 119, 112). 1922 saw Duncan hit 44 doubles (3rd in NL) and drive in 94 runs (7th). 1924 saw the tables turn on Duncan, as his ineffective hitting that year led to being replaced by Rube Bressler and his major league career was over at the age of 30.

66. Gary Nolan

Played as Red Primary Position Career Rank Peak Rank Prime Rank
1967-73, 1975-77 SP 45 85 81
Percent Breakdown of Value Best Season Best player on Reds
Hit Field Pitch 1970 Never
0% 0% 100%
Awards/Honors as a Red Leading the League On the Reds Leaderboard
Hutch Award – 1975
All Star – 1972
Strikeouts Per Innings – 1967
W-L Percentage – 1972
Walks Per Inning – 1975, 1976
Strikeout/Walk Ratio – 1976

-4th in career WHIP
-4th in career K/BB ratio
-7th in career W-L percentage
-7th in career strikeouts
-17th in career ERA+

The anatomy of a shredded arm. In 1967, debuting as an 18-year-old rookie, Gary Nolan was awesome. Nolan went 14-8, with a 2.58 ERA (147 ERA+) and 206 strikeouts over 226.2 innings. Two decent years followed, albeit in part-time duty. Then in 1970, Nolan broke out again: 18-7, 3.27 ERA (128 ERA+), and 181 K in 250.2 innings, serving as the 22-year-old ace of a pennant winning team. A mediocre 1971 followed, then in 1972, Nolan was on his way to his best season yet, with a 13-2 record and a 1.81 ERA at the all-star break. Neck and shoulder pain limited him to just 31.2 innings the rest of the year, however. Then just 10.1 innings in 1973, and he missed he ’74 season completely. For the triumphant seasons of 1975-76, Nolan was back in full-time duty (210.2 and 239.1 innings, respectively) as a 15-game winner both years, but did it as the ultimate soft-tosser: leading the league in walk prevention, and compiling just 187 strikeouts in the two seasons combined. The next year, more injuries struck, and Nolan retired.

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